190 Famous Poems in English Part 02 l Famous Poems in English l ELP

Here is 190 Famous Poems in English Part 02 for you!
(190 Famous Poems in English Part 01)

• The Raven: It is written by Edgar Allen Poe. It tells the story of a lover who is visited by a talking raven. The raven enhances his distress with its constant repetition of the word “Nevermore”, slowly plunging him into madness.
• Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer’s Day: It is written by Shakespeare. Shakespeare starts Sonnet 18 with a flattering question to his beloved: “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” It was published in 1609.
• The Tyger: It is written by William Blake. The speaker focuses on the subject of creation asking who could have made such a terrifying beast as the tiger. Cambridge calls it “the most anthologized poem in English”. 
• Daffodils: It is written by Wordsworth. It was published in 1807. It simply tells about the poet discovering a field of beautiful flowers while wandering. 
• Beowulf: It is the oldest surviving long poem in Old English. It is regarded as the highest achievement of Old English Literature. Its poet is unknown.
• If: It is written by Rudyard Kipling. It was published in 1910. It presents a set of situations and the ideal behaviour a person should adopt when he encounters them.
• The Road Not Taken: It is written by Robert Frost. It was published in 1916. In it the speaker stands in the woods pondering which of the two roads should he take.
• Sonnet 29: It is written by Shakespeare. It is a lamentation on the loss of fame and fortune but ends with a meditation on the love that he has for his beloved.
• Mending Wall: It is written by Robert Frost. It is about two neighbors rebuilding a fence between their property during a cold winter in New England. It was published in 1914.
• Invictus: It is written by W E Henley. It is a stirring charge to remember that we are not merely given over to our fates.
(Robert Browning MCQs Part 02)
(30,000+ Idioms With Examples)
(Advanced Spoken English Course)

• Pioneers! O Pioneers!: It is written by Walt Whitman. It serves as a reminder of where we have come from and where we can go.
• Horatius: It is written by T B Macaulay. It is a ballad that recounts the legendary courage of an ancient Roman army officer, Publius Horatius Cocles.
• The Builders: It is written by H W Longfellow. In it the poet says that all of us are architects, all of our days are building blocks that contribute to the structure of our existence.
• The Negro Speaks of Rivers: It is written by Langston Hughes. It tells about the struggle of African Americans across the span of time.
• A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning: John Donne wrote it to his wife upon leaving for a trip abroad. He compares her to being the arm of a compass that is fixed in place and himself to being the arm extended outward, yet still connected.
• Ode 1.11: It is written by Horace. It admonishes us to remember that we are not promised tomorrow, and calls us to do what needs to be done today.
• Because I Could Not Stop For Death: It is written by Emily Dickinson. In it a female speaker tells the story of how she was visited by “Death”.
• The Second Coming: It is written by
W B Yeats. It describes a deeply mysterious and powerful alternative to the Christian idea of the Second Coming.
• She Walks in Beauty: It is written by Lord Byron. It praises the beauty of a woman. The speaker compares this woman to a lovely night with a clear starry sky.
• O Captain! My Captain!: It is written by Walt Whitman. It is an elegy written to commemorate the death of
President Abraham Lincoln.
(The Old Man and The Sea MCQs Part 02)
(50,000+ English Literature MCQs)
(Advanced Grammar MCQs)

• I’m Nobody! Who are You?: It is written by Emily Dickinson. It questions the value of public admiration. It highlights the virtues of anonymity and isolation.
• The Red Wheelbarrow: It is written by William Carlos Williams. It consists of a single sentence describing a red wheelbarrow, wet with rain, sitting beside some chickens.
• Fire and Ice: It is written by Robert Frost. It is a popular poem that discusses the end of the world. It was published in 1920.
• Once Upon A Time: It is written by
Gabriel Okara. It focuses on culture clash, namely how Western culture changed the old African culture.
• No Man is an Island: It is written by
John Donne. In this poem the poet speaks about humanity. He says that a human being when isolated from others does not thrive.
•Ode on a Grecian Urn: It is written by John Keats. It examines the close relationship between art, beauty, and truth. it is through beauty that humankind comes closest to truth.
•Ode to a Nightingale: It is written by John Keats. It focuses on a speaker standing in a dark forest, listening to the beautiful song of the nightingale bird.
•Ode to the Skylark: It is written by P B Shelley. It describes the powerful grace and beauty of the skylark’s birdsong.
•Ode to the West Wind: It is written by P B Shelley. The speaker treats the west wind as a force of death and decay, and welcomes this death and decay because it means that rejuvenation and rebirth will come soon.
• On His Blindness: It is written by John Milton. It deals with one’s limitations and shortcomings in life. Everyone has them and Milton’s blindness is a perfect example of this.
(Robert Frost MCQs Part 02)
(20,000+ Linguistics MCQs)
(American Literature MCQs)

• The Rape of Lucrece: It is a narrative poem by William Shakespeare. It is about the legendary Roman noblewoman Lucretia.
•Tam O Shanter: It is written by Robert Burns. It describes the habits of Tam and his thoughtless ways specifically towards his wife, who is angrily waiting at home for him.
• Paul Revere’s Ride: It is written by H W Longfellow. It commemorates the actions of American patriot Paul Revere on April 18, 1775, although with significant inaccuracies.
• Goblin Market: It is written by
Christina Rossetti. It tells the story of Laura and Lizzie who are tempted with fruit by goblin merchants.
• The Highwayman: It is written by
Alfred Noyes. It tells the story of an unnamed highwayman who is in love with Bess, an innkeeper’s daughter.
• Golden Slumbers: It is a lullaby from Thomas Dekker’s 1603 play Patient Grissel, written with Henry Chettle and William Haughton. 
• My Heart Leaps Up: It is written by Wordsworth. It describes the pure delight the speaker feels upon seeing a rainbow.
• Lullaby: It is written by W H Auden. It is a modern lullaby for all lovers.
• Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening: It is written by Robert Frost. It comprises the thoughts of an adult, why he stops and why he wants to stay in the lap of nature, forgetting all his worldly affairs.
• Hope is the Thing with Feathers:  It is written by Emily Dickinson. In it the speaker describes hope as a bird that perches in the soul.
(Gulliver’s Travels MCQs Part 01)
(Indian English Literature MCQs)
(Summaries)

• The New Colossus: It is written by Emma Lazarus. It was written in 1883 to raise money for the construction of a pedestal for the Statue of Liberty.
• The World is Too Much With Us: It is a sonnet by Wordsworth. In it, Wordsworth criticises the world of the First Industrial Revolution for being absorbed in materialism and distancing itself from nature.
• We Wear the Mask: It is written by Paul Laurence Dunbar. It is a reaction to the experience of being black in America in the late 19th century, following the Civil War.
• A Dream Within a Dream: It is written by Edgar Allen Poe. It dramatizes the confusion felt by the narrator as he watches the important things in life slip away.
• I Heard a Fly Buzz When I Died: It is written by Emily Dickinson. It attempts to imagine the transition between life and death.
• The Passionate Shepherd to His Love: It is written by Christopher Marlowe. It is a poem of seduction. In it, the speaker tries to convince his listener to come to the country and be his lover.
• Acquainted with the Night: It is written by Robert Frost. In it the speaker describes a solitary nighttime outing in the city.
• To My Dear and Loving Husband: It is written by Anne Bradstreet. It is a poem about married love between a man and wife. It proposes that such love has a powerful effect on the two people involved.
• Crossing the Bar: It is written by
Alfred Tennyson. It represents travelling serenely and securely from life through death.
• I Felt a Funeral in My Brain: It is written by Emily Dickinson. It depicts the difficulty of understanding the mysterious thoughts and feelings that happen inside people.
(190 Famous Poems in English Part 01)

• A Noiseless Patient Spider: It is written by Walt Whitman. It explores the relationship between the individual self and the larger world.
• When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be: It is written by John Keats. It centers on a speaker’s anxiety about dying before being able to achieve his/her aspirations as a poet.
• A Psalm of Life: It is written by H W Longfellow. Longfellow wrote it not long after the death of his first wife and while thinking about how to make the best of life.
• Holy Sonnet 10: Death, Be Not Proud: It is written by John Donne. It emphasizes that man, though fated to die, is more powerful than death itself.
• Ulysses: It is written by Alfred Tennyson. Facing old age, mythical hero Ulysses describes his discontent and restlessness upon returning to his kingdom, Ithaca, after his far-ranging travels.
• A Red, Red Rose: It is written by
Robert Burns. It describes the speaker’s deep love for his/her beloved and promises that this love will last longer than human life and even the planet itself.
•A Poison Tree: It is written by William Blake. In it the speaker presents a powerful argument against the suppression of anger.
• To a Mouse: It is written by Robert Burns. In it the speaker expresses sorrow for the animal’s plight after he accidentally destroyed a mouse’s nest with his plough.
• Success is Counted Sweetest: It is written by Emily Dickinson. It argues that “success” is valued most by those who don’t have it. The more successful you are, the less you appreciate that success.
• Birches: It is written by Robert Frost. It explores children’s ability to find joy and wonder in everyday life
(Characters Literature Part 1)

• When I Consider How My Light Is Spent: It is written by John Milton. It reflects on the physical and spiritual challenges the speaker faces as a blind person.
• I Have a Rendezvous With Death: It is written by Alan Seeger. It is about the speaker’s certainty that he will soon die on the battlefield.
• Auguries of Innocence: It is written by William Blake. It contains a series of paradoxes which speak of innocence juxtaposed with evil and corruption.
• Frost at Midnight: It is written by S T Coleridge. In it the speaker sits up late at night in a rural cottage, his infant sleeping by his side. He thinks about his own youth before turning to his hopes for his young child’s future.
• A Bird, Came Down the Walk: It is written by Emily Dickinson. The speaker’s everyday encounter with a bird leads to thoughts about the frightening side of nature as well as nature’s beauty.
• Alone: It is written by Edgar Allen Poe. In it the speaker describes his lifelong feelings of loneliness, isolation and difference.
• Remember: It is written by
Christina Rossetti. In it the speaker begs a loved one to remember her after her death.
• Sea Fever: It is written by John Masefield. It describes the poet’s longing to go to sea.
• When We Two Parted: It is written by
Lord Byron. It describes the pain and disillusionment that follow a break-up between the speaker and his lover. 
• The Arrow and the Song: It is written by H W Longfellow. The poet says that whatever a person does or says never goes in vain. His words and actions possess the power to uplift, hurt and please.
(Amitav Ghosh MCQs)

• The Eagle: It is written by Alfred Tennyson. In it Tennyson portrays the swiftness and agility of the king of birds (eagle)
• Break, Break, Break: It is written by Alfred Tennyson. It implies that the speaker is mourning someone’s death and being forced to face the fact that this person will never return.
• Bright Star: It is written by John Keats. In it the speaker wishes to be a bright star but not to exist as a lonely entity, aloof and watching. Instead, he wants to always be with his fair love.
• Locksley Hall: It is written by Tennyson. In it the speaker visits an area called Locksley Hall, where he spent some years in his youth and where he fell crazy together with his cousin, Amy.
(190 Famous Poems in English Part 01)

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